Datapoint Palenquero/Alignment of case marking of personal pronouns

The situation is somewhat complex in that there are two ways (sometimes in free variation?) to mark patient personal pronouns. In examining the forms and examples below, readers should keep in mind that lo is an object but not a subject form (the subject form is ele).

The first option mirrors that of Spanish:

I kelé toká-lo. 'I want to touch it.'

The second option places the subject form of the pronoun after the verb:

I kelé toká-ele. 'I want to touch it.'

Patiño Rosselli (1983: 163–164) examines the difference between the two constructions, but the question deserves closer scrutiny.

One final note: in some persons (e.g. second singular), there is no nominative-accusative distinction.

Values

Accusative alignment

Example 48-114:
I kelé toká-lo.
I
I
kelé
want
toká-lo.
touch-it
I want to touch it.
Spanish: Quiero tocarlo.
Example 48-115:
Hende asé-o punta [...].
Hende
people
asé-o
make-it
punta
point
[...].
[...]
One makes (it) a point [...].
Spanish: Se le hace una punta [...].

Source: de Friedemann & Patiño Rosselli 1983: 164, ex. d

Example 48-117:
Ele kelé ablá-mi too e día.
Ele
he/she
kelé
want
ablá-mi
talk-me
too
all
e
det
día.
day
He/she wants to talk to me all day long.
Spanish: Él/ella quiere hablarme todo el día.
Confidence:
Certain