Datapoint Palenquero/Savvy

There are no indications in the phonology of Palenquero sabé 'to know' that the item was derived from Portuguese rather than Spanish.

Note that saber is bifunctional in Palenquero. That is, it has the lexical meaning of 'to know', and also a strictly aspectual function, i.e. HABITUAL, comparable to Spanish soler.

Preverbal asé or sabé (the latter being a far less frequent though not uncommon marker) are used to express habitual aspect. Habitual aspect is, however, often simply implied, i.e. not expressed overtly by asé or sabé.

Note: the HABITUAL use of Palenquero sabé is a feature that was once common in Spanish. See:
Lida Malkiel (1948/1949: 269–283).

Values

A savvy word exists

Example 48-20:
Mailo mi, ele kele sabé naa ri eso nu!
Mailo
husband
mi,
my
ele
he
kele
want
sabé
know
naa
nothing
ri
of
eso
this
nu!
neg
My husband, he doesn't want to know anything about this!
Spanish: ¡Mi marido no quiere saber nada de eso!
Example 48-23:
Yo i sabé eso nu.
Yo
I
i
dep.pro.1sg
sabé
know
eso
this
nu.
neg
I don't know this.
Spanish: (Yo) no sé eso.
Example 48-24:
Bo o sabé eso nu.
Bo
you
o
dep.pro.2sg
sabé
know
eso
this
nu.
neg
You don't know this.
Spanish: (Vos) no sabe eso.
Example 48-92:
Ané sabé-ba asé eso nu.
Ané
they
sabé-ba
hab-pst.hab
asé
do
eso
this
nu.
neg
They did not use to do this.
Spanish: Ellos no solían hacer eso.
Example 48-189:
Pero ele a-sabé toká tambié tambó, ¿belá?
Pero
but
ele
he/she
a-sabé
?-hab
toká
play
tambié
also
tambó,
drum
¿belá?
right
But he/she used to also play the drum, right?
Spanish: Pero él/ella solía también tocar el tambor, ¿verdad?

Source: Schwegler & Green 2007: 280

Confidence:
Very certain