Datapoint Diu Indo-Portuguese/The associative plural

Diu Indo-Portuguese features a particular type of plural which may be termed associative plural according to the criteria of referential heterogeneity and reference to groups, but which in fact transcends the semantics of an associative plural. This particular construction circumscribes the referential potential of the NP not so much to elements associated to a given prominent member of the group but rather to elements sharing (a) certain feature(s) with a standard. This construction is therefore most properly termed a similative plural. Its translation equivalent is not necessarily 'X and associates' but rather 'X and people/things like X'.

The similative/associative plural involves the same marker of additive plurality, viz. tud (also a universal quantifier), although in a different position relative to the head noun. Whereas tud precedes the head noun in additive plural reference, it occurs immediately after the noun in a similative/associative plural.

Values

Associative plural marker identical to additive plural marker

Example 39-55:
Asĩ kwɔn vẽy mĩ nitiŋ tud, nɔs fal ikəl mem ẽ kaz purtəgez kom nɔs fal tud di.
Asĩ
so
kwɔn
when
vẽy
come.npst
my
nitiŋ
grandchild
tud,
siml
nɔs
1pl
fal
speak.npst
ikəl
dem
mem
emph
in
kaz
house
purtəgez
Portuguese
kom
like
nɔs
1pl
fal
speak.npst
tud
all
di.
day
So, when my grandchildren and so come, we speak Portuguese at home like we do every day.

Source: Cardoso 2009: 176-7

Example 39-56:
El tiŋ vay nə ũ jungle pu traze koys, aroz tud.
El
3sg
t-iŋ
ipfv-pst
vay
go.inf
loc
ũ
one
<jungle>
jungle
pu
purp
traz-e
bring-inf
koys,
thing
aroz
rice
tud.
siml
He went into a jungle to bring some things, rice and all that.

Source: Cardoso 2009: 176

Example 39-54:
Es tud ε kaz də tud pad.
Es
this
tud
pl
ε
cop.npst
kaz
house
of
tud
all
pad.
priest
These are the houses of the priests.

Source: Cardoso 2009: 175

Confidence:
Very certain