Datapoint Diu Indo-Portuguese/Order of adposition and noun phrase

There are two types of adpositions in Diu Indo-Portuguese, viz. simple and complex adpositions. Complex adpositions (e.g. pɛrt də 'close to/near', frẽt də 'in front of') consist of an element which is usually adverbial in nature and the preposition , whose prototypical semantics cover both ablative and possessive.

All adpositions in Diu Indo-Portuguese precede the NP they govern. The only recorded exception to this rule is the complex comitative adposition jũt də, 'with'. The overwhelming majority of instances of this adposition follow the expected jũt + + NP structure, but occasionally the structure () + NP + jũt also occurs. Notice, however, that the + NP is formally equivalent to a possessive PP, which normally follows the head noun but in the corpus sometimes occurs pre-nominally. The inversion of the canonical order observed for jũt də has probably come about through analogy with this type of constructions, and it remains very marginal in Diu Indo-Portuguese.

Values

Prepositions Frequency: 77.8%

Example 39-12:
Lion vey i raspo pə gat.
<Lion>
lion
vey
come.pst
i
and
rasp-o
scratch-pst
acc
gat.
cat
The lion came and scratched the cat.

Source: Cardoso 2009: 181

Example 39-8:
Ũ piken rat tiŋ vay nə del kamiŋ.
one
piken
small
rat
mouse
t-iŋ
ipfv-pst
vay
go.inf
loc
də-el
of-3sg
kamiŋ.
way
One small mouse was going about its way.

Source: Cardoso 2009: 166

Confidence:
Very certain

Postpositions Frequency: 11.1%

Example 39-14:
Mĩ jũt nã te muyt diŋer nã te.
1sg.obl
jũt
together
neg
te
exist.npst
muyt
much
diŋer
money
neg
te.
exist.npst
I don't have much money (lit. With me/next to me there isn't much money).

Source: Cardoso 2009: 134

Confidence:
Certain

Circumpositions Frequency: 11.1%

Example 39-205:
yo fik d-ɛl jũt.
yo
1sg
fik
dwell.npst
d-ɛl
of-3sg.f
jũt.
together
I live with her. OR: I live next to her.

Source: Cardoso 2009: 187

Confidence:
Certain