Datapoint Pidgin Hawaiian/Transitive motion verbs: ‘push’

The simple locative marker (used for at-rest situations) ma can be used in place of special motion-to prepositions, malalo can also be used as a motion-to preposition and directional.

Values

At-rest marking is used to express motion-to Frequency: 70.0%

Example 71-144:
Makawela hanapaa hou kela puu wau, kulai ma ke kuauna.
Makawela
Makawela
hanapaa
grab
hou
again
kela
det
puu
throat
wau,
1sg.poss
kulai
shove
ma
loc
ke
def
kuauna.
river.bank
Makawela grabbed my throat again and shoved [me] into the river bank.
Example 71-147:
Lalau kela poo au kulai malalo.
Lalau
seize
kela
det
poo
head
au
1sg.poss
kulai
shove
malalo.
down
[He] grabbed my head and pushed it down.
Example 71-143:
Wau no moe malalo.
Wau
1sg
no
intens
moe
rest
malalo.
below
I rested (on the bed) below.
Example 71-4:
Akoi ma kela lumi Lam See.
Akoi
Akoi
ma
loc
kela
det
lumi
room
Lam
Lam
See.
See
Akoi was in Lam See's room.
Confidence:
Certain

Serial verb construction plus preposition Frequency: 30.0%

Example 71-145:
Akahi kepani kulai ia‘u hina malalo o ka lepo.
Akahi
indf
kepani
Japanese
kulai
shove
ia‘u
obj.1sg
hina
fall
malalo
down
o
poss
ka
def
lepo.
ground
A Japanese pushed me down into the ground.
Example 71-146:
Kela ekolu kepani hanapaa kela pake hina malalo.
Kela
det
ekolu
three
kepani
Japanese
hanapaa
hold
kela
det
pake
Chinese
hina
fall
malalo.
down
Three Japanese held the Chinese down.
Confidence:
Certain