Datapoint Sango/Order of demonstrative and noun

Although the word so 'this' meets the criteria, I think, of being considered a demonstrative, it does not contrast syntactically with the word ka 'there'. This has already been noted. Also, as some of the examples show, the function of so is not as strong as a demonstrative. Speakers are not using it to mean 'this' to distinguish a noun from some other noun in the discourse or context. It may have a textual function: to keep the audiences' attention focused on the participants of the story. It may also be a stylistic feature: another example of the great amount of repetition (or redundance) in the use of certain words.

Values

Demonstrative word follows noun

Example 59-18:
tona lo mu koli so awe, [...]
tongana
when
lo
3sg
mu
take
koli
man
so
dem
awe,
already
[...]
[...]
After she had married this man, [...].
Example 59-19:
samba ti mama ti lo ni so agoo ti baa lo fadso
samba
co-wife
ti
of
mama
mother
ti
of
lo
3sg
ni
det
so
dem
a-gwe
pm-go
ti
of
baa
see
lo
3sg
fadeso
now
Then the co-wife of her mother went to see her (the daughter).
Example 59-20:
koli so, lo ke te zo tengo
koli
man
so,
dem
lo
3sg
ke
cop
te
eat
zo
person
tengo
eating
This man, he really eats people.
Example 59-21:
koli so alondo na ngonda ti gingo azo ti lo ni
koli
man
so
dem
alondo
sm.arise
na
prep
ngonda
bush
ti
of
gingo
hunt.nmlz
azo
pl.person
ti
of
lo
3sg
ni
det
The husband came from the bush where he hunted people. OR: The husband left his bush for hunting people.
Example 59-22:
mama ni so, lo ke lango na bi ape
mama
mother
ni
det
so,
dem
lo
3sg
ke
cop
lango
sleep
na
prep
bi
night
ape
neg
The mother, she didn't sleep through the night. OR: The mother didn't sleep at night.

Source: Samarin 2007

Confidence:
Very certain