Datapoint Bahamian Creole/Nominal plural marker and third-person-plural pronoun

In Bahamian Creole English, them functions not only as a demonstrative determiner and a third-person plural pronoun for subject, object, and possessive (cf. Holm & Shilling 1982: 204), but also as a plural marker following the noun.
-s also functions as a plural marker; the combination of both, as fellow-s-them in example 50, is very frequent.

Values

Overlap

Example 12-49:
Dem had a conversation about Jesus.
Dem
3pl.sbj
had
have.pst
a
art
conversation
conversation
about
about
Jesus.
Jesus
They talked about Jesus.

Source: Holm & Shilling 1982: 204

Example 12-50:
We had barracuda poison. We catch a barracuda coming up into George Town. [And what happened?] And he was poison - black as Shine. I tell the - fellows-them throw him in the sea.
[...]
[...]
I
1sg.sbj
tell
tell[pfv]
the
art
-
 
fellows-them
fellow.pl-pl
[...].
[...]
[...] I told the (other) guys (on the boat) [to throw him back into the sea].
Example 12-51:
He's have that, right, and he's go to the clinic, he have to go to clinic tomorrow, the nurse-them say - boy, and he used to go there mus'e from he was around three.
[...]
[...]
the
the
nurse-them
nurse-pl
say
say
[...]
[...]
[...] the nurses say [...]
Example 12-45:
B’Booky them having hard times.
B’Booky
B'Booky
them
ass
hav-ing
have-prog
hard
hard
time-s.
time-pl
B’Booky and his family/friends/associates were having hard times.

Source: Crowley 1966: 61

Confidence:
Very certain