Datapoint Bahamian Creole/The associative plural

The plural word them (as in Example 40) also functions as the associative plural marker (as in Example 45), sometimes introduced by and (as in Examples 46). Speakers aiming at a more acrolectal level may substitute them by the Standard English demonstrative, those, in which case and usually precedes the associative plural (as in Examples 47 and 48).

Values

Associative plural marker identical to additive plural marker

Example 12-45:
B’Booky them having hard times.
B’Booky
B'Booky
them
ass
hav-ing
have-prog
hard
hard
time-s.
time-pl
B’Booky and his family/friends/associates were having hard times.

Source: Crowley 1966: 61

Example 12-46:
And like - when - when my aunt and them was on the Island, and she say the people dress the snake and put the bowtie 'round the snake and send the snake to her - and when she woke up in there hear the snake coming down in her house, right down for her, and all she do - when she whoof her hand like that, she grab that snake, and she tie him up and leave him there until in the morning.
[...]
[...]
when
when
my
1sg.poss.det
aunt
aunt
and
and
them
ass
[...]
[...]
[...] when my aunt and her family/friends/associates [were still living on the [Out] Island...].
Example 12-47:
Christine and those left already?
Christine
Christine
and
and
those
ass
left
left
already?
already
Christine and her friends left already?
Example 12-48:
Your little friend came by today axing me, Stephanie and those here?
[...]
[...]
Stephanie
Stephanie
and
and
those
ass
here
here
[...] Are Stephanie and her friends here?
Example 12-40:
Miss - the boys - them broke down Bay Street.
Miss
Miss
-
 
the
art
boys
boy.pl
-
 
them
pl
broke
break[pfv]
down
down
Bay
Bay
Street.
Street
Miss, the men completely destroyed Bay Street.
Confidence:
Very certain