Welcome to APiCS Online

Fishing boats: Fishermen selling their catch at Abandze, Ghana, the site of the first British trading station on the Gold Coast, Fort Kormantin, established in 1632. Photograph by Thorsten Brato, 2008.

This web site contains supporting electronic material for the Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures (APiCS), a publication of Oxford University Press. APiCS shows comparable synchronic data on the grammatical and lexical structures of 76 pidgin and creole languages. The language set contains not only the most widely studied Atlantic and Indian Ocean creoles, but also less well known pidgins and creoles from Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Melanesia and Australia, including some extinct varieties, and several mixed languages.

APiCS Online is a separate publication, edited by Susanne Maria Michaelis, Philippe Maurer, Martin Haspelmath, and Magnus Huber. It was made possible by support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

APiCS Online contains information on 76 languages and 130 structural features, which was contributed by 88 contributors. There are 18525 examples illustrating the features and feature values. In addition, APiCS Online is designed to allow comparison with data from WALS (the World Atlas of Language Structures).

APiCS Online is an edited database consisting of 76 datasets which should be regarded as separate publications, like chapters of an edited volume. These datasets should be cited as follows:

Fish & Sari: Hanging bummalo ("Bombay duck") to dry on the beach of Simbor, the site of a ruined Portuguese fort not far from Diu, India. Photograph by Hugo Cardoso, 2005.
Salikoko S. Mufwene. 2013. Kikongo-Kituba structure dataset.
In: Michaelis, Susanne Maria & Maurer, Philippe & Haspelmath, Martin & Huber, Magnus (eds.)
Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures Online.
Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
(Available online at http://apics-online.info/contributions/58, Accessed on 2014-07-22.)

The complete work should be cited as follows:

Michaelis, Susanne Maria & Maurer, Philippe & Haspelmath, Martin & Huber, Magnus (eds.) 2013.
Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures Online.
Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
(Available online at http://apics-online.info, Accessed on 2014-07-22.)

APiCS Online overlaps with the book version of the Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures (APiCS). Like the book atlas, it shows all the maps, and in addition, it shows examples for each feature-language combination. But it does not include the detailed discussion text on each of the 130 structural features that the book atlas contains.