Datapoint Papiamentu/Politeness distinctions in second-person pronouns

The 2nd person pronouns bo and boso can be used for any addressee, without politeness implications. Nonetheless, politeness may be expressed by addressing a person as Señor/Señora (as indicated by Goilo 1972: 35), or, more commonly as Shon (literally: 'Mister/Mrs.') – a form which is not gendered. In the example Shon warda kurpa, the addressee is a young girl, addressed by an old man, showing that Shon is truly a politeness marker. Also, forms such as mai ('mum'), pai ('dad'), and other kinship terms and the addressee's name can be used in place of pronoun bo in addressing the relevant person. Persons in certain professions may be addressed by their professional title, e.g. dòkter 'doctor'.
I have classified this system as involving avoidance of 2nd person pronouns, but the frequency of this usage has not been investigated, and is probably highly context dependent.

Values

Titles used as second person forms

Example 47-36:
Shon warda kurpa.
Shon
Sir/Madam
warda
keep
kurpa.
body
You should be careful [of the cold weather].

Source: Maurer 1988a: 394

Example 47-37:
Shon por yuda mi un ratu?
Shon
Sir/Madam
por
be.able
yuda
help
mi
1sg
un
indf
ratu?
while
Could you help me please?

Source: Joubert 2002: 292

Example 47-38:
Roberto tin Roberto su buki?
Roberto
Roberto
tin
have
Roberto
Roberto
su
poss
buki?
book
Do you have your book? (Literally: Does Roberto have Roberto's book?)

Source: Birmingham 1970: 64

Confidence:
Very certain