Datapoint Berbice Dutch/Object relative clauses

Relative clauses are most often introduced by the all-purpose relativizer wati. In Kouwenberg (1994: 370ff), I argue that wati may be a complementizer rather than a relative pronoun. One argument in favor of this analysis is provided by the occurrence of resumptive pronouns in quite a few cases. Another is the occasional use of complementizer dati in its place.
A zero-relativized clause in which the relativized element is the object is attested only for the verb rupu 'call, name'.

Values

Relative particle and gap Frequency: 63.6%

Example 28-153:
o wontɛ musu plɛkap wat o dektɛ fan di kɛnap
o
3sg
won-tɛ
win-pfv
musu
many
plɛkɛ-apu
place-pl
wati
rel
o
3sg
deki-tɛ
take-pfv
fan
from
di
def
kɛnɛ-apu
person-pl
He conquered many places which he took from the people.

Source: Kouwenberg 1994a: 361

Example 28-150:
di besti bita dat o kan draki o krikitɛ nau
di
the
beʃti
best
bita
clothes
dati
that
o
3sg
kan
can
draki
wear
o
3sg
kriki-tɛ
get-pfv
nau
now
The very best clothes that he could wear he got.

Source: Kouwenberg 1994a: 371

Confidence:
Very certain

Relative particle and resumptive pronoun Frequency: 27.3%

Example 28-151:
o drak difrɛn draki wat ju kan jefjo ka
o
3sg
draki
bear
difrɛn
different
draki
bear
wati
rel
ju
2sg
kan
can
jefi
eat
o
3sg
ka
neg
It bears another fruit which you cannot eat.

Source: Kouwenberg 1994a: 375

Confidence:
Uncertain

Zero and gap Frequency: 9.1%

Example 28-152:
mu mɛr bof eni hab en plɛk en rup bunjabanab
mu
go
mɛrɛ
more
bofu
up
eni
3pl
habu
have
en
one
plɛkɛ
place
eni
3pl
rupu
call
bunjabanab
Bunya.Benab
Further upriver they have a place (which) they call Bunja Benab. OR: Further upriver there is a place (which) is called Bunja Benab.

Source: Kouwenberg 1994a: 378

Confidence:
Uncertain