Datapoint Nicaraguan Creole English/Suppletion according to tense and aspect

Nicaraguan Creole English has a few more verb forms featuring suppletion according to tense than San Andres Creole English. While Holm (1978: 249–250) states that sie/sed, tel/tuol, kyaan/kun, iz/woz are equivalent forms in the basilect, this no longer seems to hold for present-day Nicaraguan Creole where English conjugated past tense forms abound and the latter variants are past tense forms of the former. The same applies to go/gaan.
As in San Andres Creole English, some basic verb forms look as if they were derived from the English past tense but sometimes actually continue British dialectal forms, e.g. brook, draundid, laas, lef, luodid, marid, wuundid. Basic verbs derived from the English present participle are fishin, gwain, kuortin (cf. Holm 1978: 130; at present, gwain is however used as a progressive form). All of these forms occur in San Andres Creole English as well.

Values

Strong suppletion according to tense only

Example 11-168:
So aftaword shi sed [...].
So
so
aftaword
afterwards
shi
3sg.f
sed
say.pst
[...].
[...]
So afterwards she said [...].

Source: Nicaragua project recordings CD

Example 11-169:
Ai livd tu sii hou wi woz obiidient.
Ai
1sg
liv-d
live-pst
tu
comp
sii
see
hou
how
wi
1pl
woz
cop.pst
obiidient.
obedient
I lived at the time and recall how obedient we were.

Source: Nicaragua project recordings CD

Example 11-170:
Iz Sheldiin di jrondid!
Iz
cop.prs
Sheldiin
Sheldiin
di
pst
jrondid!
drown
It’s Sheldiin who nearly drowned!
Example 11-171:
Wi gaan de twelv oklak.
Wi
1pl
gaan
go.pst
de
dem.loc
twelv
twelve
o-klak.
o'-clock
We went there at twelve o'clock.

Source: Nicaragua project recordings CD

Example 11-71:
Aligieta gou ap tu footiin fiit.
Aligieta
alligator
gou
go
ap
up
tu
to
foo-tiin
four-teen
fiit.
feet
Alligators measure up to fourteen feet.

Source: Nicaragua project recordings CD

Example 11-34:
Hou yu gwain hevn an noh hav wing fa flai?
Hou
how
yu
2sg
gwain
go.prog
hevn
heaven
an
and
no
neg
hav
have
wing
wing
fa
for
flai?
fly
How are you going to heaven even though you don’t have wings to fly?
Example 11-21:
Wat dat iz?
Wat
what
dat
dem
iz?
cop.prs
What is that?

Source: Nicaragua project recordings CD

Confidence:
Very certain