Datapoint Sranan (Dutch-influenced)/Comparative adjective marking

There are two patterns involving the order of comparative degree words and adjectives in Sranan,
which relate to differences between two dialects. Dialect A is the default lect in the present Sranan data set and is spoken primarily by Surinamese of African descent in poorer areas of Paramaribo and in rural areas, and Dialect B is spoken primarily by Dutch dominant speakers (Winford 1997). In cases where only the item being compared is mentioned, as in mi brada moro langa ‘my brother is taller’, or mi brada na a moro langa wan ‘my brother is the tallest’, the comparative marker moro precedes the adjective, and can be interpreted as marking the adjective. This pattern is found in both dialects. In cases where both the item being compared and the standard are present, the degree word (moro or pasa) can either follow the property item, or, in case of moro, precede it, or even both precede and follow it. When moro precedes the property item, it can be interpreted as a comparative marker. When it follows the property item, it can be interpreted as a standard marker. The latter also applies to pasa, which can only follow the property item (Winford 1997).
See also my comments on Feature 8 "Order of degree word and adjective".

Values

Adjective is marked Frequency: 50.0%

Example 2-91:
John de moro bigi leki/dan Peter.
John
John
de
cop
moro
more
bigi
big
leki/dan
than
Peter.
Peter
John is taller than Peter.

Source: Winford 1997: 280

Example 2-24:
A oloisi disi moro diri.
A
det
oloisi
watch
disi
dem
moro
more
diri.
dear
This watch is more expensive.

Source: Winford 1997: 279

Confidence:
Certain

Adjective is not marked Frequency: 50.0%

Example 2-92:
John bigi moro Peter.
John
John
bigi
big
moro
exceed
Peter.
Peter
John’s bigger than Peter.

Source: Winford 1997: 279

Confidence:
Certain